The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly ...

By: Marty Chenard | Fri, Jun 3, 2011
Print Email

That's what we will look at this morning ...

Three charts, Three conditions ... Good, Bad, and Ugly which describe WHAT is happening in the market today.

The Good: For the first chart, we will visit the S&P 500 back to February 2010. The focus today should be on the red support line which has been in place for 8 months. That support line was tested again yesterday on its 4th. touch point. It survived with the index closing above the support.

FYI ... Institutional Investors considered the S&P 500 to be the best indicator of the economy because it represents so many diverse sectors.

The Bad: Today we will focus on the S&P's second largest sector ... the Financial sector. The Financial sector represents 15.06% of the S&P, and the largest sector is Info Tech which represents 18.02% of the S&P.

Bottom line, the Financials have a large influence on the S&P 500 due to its weighting. So, let's look at the Banking index as a proxy for what is happening in that sector.

This weekly chart of the Banking index shows that it had peak in May of 2010, and it hasn't been able to even match that level since. Please see the next chart ...

This next chart combines the first two charts on a weekly basis. Note the two lines labeled 1 and 2 on each index.

What becomes clear is that the S&P's rise has occurred with its second largest sector moving in the opposite direction. This negative divergence is an out-of-balance condition that will need to be rebalanced fairly soon by the markets. Please see the last chart ...

This next chart is posted on our paid subscriber site every day and is presented here as a courtesy to free members today ... In fairness to our paid subscribers, this chart will not be shown here again until sometime in July.

The Ugly: This chart measures Inflowing Liquidity on a daily basis. The stock market follows the direction of money. If money is pouring in and chasing stocks, the market goes up. When money is leaving the market, stocks get sold and the market goes down.

There are two major levels of Liquidity on this chart ... Expansion and Contraction. Bull Markets always have Liquidity in Expansion and Bear Markets have Liquidity in Contraction. So, as the S&P and Banking Index are out of balance, the market's Liquidity has been flowing out. This is a very dangerous condition that should be monitored and respected by all investors.

 


 

Marty Chenard

Author: Marty Chenard

Marty Chenard
StockTiming.com
Asheville, NC 28805
Tel: 828-296-1200

Marty Chenard is an Advanced Stock Market Technical Analyst that has developed his own proprietary analytical tools and stock market models. As a result, he was out of the market two weeks before the 1987 Crash in the most recent Bear Market he faxed his Members in March 2000 telling them all to SELL. He is an advanced technical analyst and not an investment advisor, nor a securities broker.

StockTiming.com is dedicated to Stock Market Investors who want the best information on stock charts, stock market trends, stock market timing and technical analysis.

Be My Guest and Take Advantage of Our Free Membership ... Get a Free Membership to StockTiming.com ... Youll receive important daily messages before the market opens and direct links to todays important web pages. Information and messages that are often not posted on our website. There is no obligation or expectation on our part ... it is just our way of proving our accuracy and timing expertise to you. Please click here for your Free Membership.

Copyright © 2006-2014 Marty Chenard

All Images, XHTML Renderings, and Source Code Copyright © Safehaven.com

SEARCH





TRUE MONEY SUPPLY

Source: The Contrarian Take http://blogs.forbes.com/michaelpollaro/
austrian-money-supply/