Two Recent Cycles to Watch

By: Ed Carlson | Tue, Jan 14, 2014
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Over the last several months two cycles have caught my eye. The first, and better known, is the seven year cycle (Figure 1). Since 1939 it has expanded or contracted beyond what could be called seven years only twice. As the last major high was in 2007, the next seven year cycle high is due this year, 2014.

Figure 1

Chart: seven year cycle

The second cycle is the Presidential Cycle. Looking at a chart showing the cumulative monthly return of the Dow during mid-term election years, 1901-2010 (not shown), a peak is expected in April. However, looking at a chart of mid-term elections taken solely from secular bear markets as defined by the Long Cycles of George Lindsay (1921-1942, 1962-1982, 2002-present) we see a top is due in February (Figure 2).


Larger Image

Figure 2

Secular Bear / Mid-term Election Years


Conclusion

I continue to look for an end to the 2009 bull market. Based on Lindsay's basic movements and Middle Section forecasts, I believe the top was seen on 12/31/13. But even if I'm wrong, the top isn't far away.

 


If you're wondering how 1921-1942 could be considered a secular bear market, that question will be the focus of the January Lindsay Report which is due this week. Acquire your copy at Seattle Technical Advisors.com.

 


 

Ed Carlson

Author: Ed Carlson

Ed Carlson
Seattle Technical Advisors.com

Ed Carlson

Ed Carlson, author of George Lindsay and the Art of Technical Analysis, and his new book, George Lindsay's An Aid to Timing is an independent trader, consultant, and Chartered Market Technician (CMT) based in Seattle. Carlson manages the website Seattle Technical Advisors.com, where he publishes daily and weekly commentary. He spent twenty years as a stockbroker and holds an M.B.A. from Wichita State University.

Copyright © 2012-2014 Ed Carlson

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