Strong Dollar in U.S. Interest

By: Axel Merk | Thu, May 17, 2007
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It seems that in order to qualify for the job, U.S. Treasury Secretaries must be able to recite 'A strong dollar is in the interest of the United States' anytime and anywhere. Robert Rubin, Treasury Secretary during the second half of the 1990s, was highly credible when he said it. However, when Secretary John Snow uttered the same words, the ritual had been diluted to providing the appropriate sound bite to the media. Hank Paulson, successor to Snow and current Treasury Secretary, is a straight talker, but knows that his job comes with what amounts to a marketing responsibility. In the meantime, investors are at a loss what the U.S. policy towards a dollar truly is; there seems to be a disconnect between what ought to be in U.S. interest, and what current policies promote.

Abby Joseph Cohen, chief investment strategist at Goldman Sachs, who may be best known for her perpetual appetite at increasing price targets for U.S. markets, called the weak U.S. dollar the "icing on the cake"; she was referring to the potential positive effect on stock valuations given that foreign earnings translate into higher earnings for U.S. companies conducting business abroad.

Congress would like to pressure the Chinese to allow their currency to appreciate, i.e. to weaken the U.S. dollar versus the Chinese yuan. If the Chinese were to oblige, it would almost certainly increase the cost of goods we import from China; and because the Chinese recycle a lot of their dollar holdings into U.S. Treasuries, any move on behalf of the Chinese to reduce their dollar holdings would put upward pressure on U.S. interest rates (because of the inverse relationship between bond prices and interest rates).

Breaking with longstanding tradition of leaving all discussions pertaining to the dollar up to the Treasury Department, Federal Reserve ("Fed") Chairman Bernanke has not shied away from commenting on the impact the dollar has on the economy. Bernanke, who considers himself a student of the Great Depression, says, "to understand the Great Depression is the Holy Grail of macroeconomics." He laments in his analysis of the Great Depression that keeping up the value of the dollar (by preserving the gold standard) increased the hardship on the people.

But the Treasury secretaries are correct: a strong dollar is in the interest of the U.S. For starters, we live in a global world, and a weaker dollar makes America less competitive. We may be able to sell a gadget cheaper that is produced in the U.S. (because it costs less when purchased in euro or yuan); but there is little left that is produced in the U.S. Also, a weaker dollar won't rebuild industries that have been lost to Asia. Sure, profits generated abroad through services provided abroad translate to higher dollar earnings, but the positive impact may be limited to a quarterly earnings release. Just as dollar cash is less competitive when it is devalued, so is a stock price when measured in a weak currency. Foreign companies can use both their stronger currency as well as their stock prices valued in hard currencies to acquire U.S. assets and enterprises.

As the dollar weakens, our purchasing power erodes. Look at the price you pay at the gas pump if you believe a weak dollar does not impact you. The oil cartel OPEC has made it clear that their price target for oil floats upward as the dollar weakens.

American consumers are not irrational; they react to monetary and fiscal policies. When interest rates are excessively low, and tax policy is geared at encouraging consumers spending, consumers spend until they drop. A weak dollar further discourages savings, as those savings erode in value. But given our current account deficit, we urgently need policies in place to encourage more savings and investments to reduce the pressure on the dollar (for more detail, please read 'The Current Account Deficit Matters').

A strong currency is also a matter of national security. Politicians are complaining that foreigners hold too much of U.S. debt. Paulson has rightfully said that by all means, we should try to maximize the demand for U.S. debt to minimize the interest rate we have to pay; this includes allowing foreigners to buy the debt. The solution, of course, would be curtail the supply of debt. In plain English: cut your spending, or foreigners will dictate in due course what you may spend your money on (that would be interest payments to them).

A weak currency is inflationary. Wall Street analysts focus on "core inflation" excluding food and energy; most have forgotten that the reason food and energy prices have traditionally been ignored is because of their volatility. But these prices have been moving upward for years now, with U.S. energy secretary Bodman already forecasting high gasoline prices for next year. Given the new love affair politicians have with ethanol, food based on corn is bound to be increasingly expensive; so far, we have only heard of the Mexican tortilla crisis, where Mexican consumers are complaining that their corn based tortillas are no longer affordable; but U.S. food prices are also affected as corn (and notably corn syrup) is in countless food items.

Globalization and the internet have held back, but not eliminated inflation. Items we don't need - mostly those we import from Asia -, have experienced tame inflation (mostly due to Asian overproduction, partially a result of their weak currencies). But just about everything we do need, from the cost of healthcare to the cost of education and local craftsmen has experienced significant inflation.

Preserving purchasing power should be in the interest of every policy maker, and in particular be in the interest of the Federal Reserve. But policy makers allow eroding purchasing power to act as a substitute to finding solutions on how to pay for obligations ranging from government debt to social security. Once a country is hooked on growth through inflation, it is difficult to change bad habits. Italy is still struggling to cope with the rigidity of the euro after decades of inflationary policies.

The Fed has allowed an unprecedented credit expansion to take place. Bernanke seems to believe there is no need to impose tighter credit to fight excesses that have been building up in the economy. However, if one allows a credit bubble to take place, one must also be willing to allow a severe recession or depression to take place to rid the economy of excesses that have been built up. Those who are most concerned about the dollar do not believe the Fed will allow such a correction to take its full course; there is already talk of a Fed interest rate cut in a few months. In our assessment, the Fed is rather concerned that a credit contraction combined with high levels of consumer debt could create a Japanese style deflationary spiral; to avoid having to deal with deflation, the Fed rather induce inflation.

The Fed can tighten money supply. The Fed can make money available. But Fed has very limited tools to encourage people (or businesses) to actually borrow money. As consumers have overextended themselves, they may be reluctant to take on more debt. Aside from lowering interest rates, one of the few tools the Fed has to encourage credit expansion is to apply a tax on savings through inflation. This, of course, is in direct violation of its mandate to pursue price stability.

Investors interested in taking some chips off the table to prepare for potential turbulence in the financial markets may want to evaluate whether gold or a basket of hard currencies are suitable ways to add diversification to their portfolios. We manage the Merk Hard Currency Fund, a fund that seeks to profit from a potential decline in the dollar. To learn more about the Fund, or to subscribe to our free newsletter, please visit www.merkfund.com.

 


 

Axel Merk

Author: Axel Merk

Axel Merk
President and CIO of Merk Investments, Manager of the Merk Funds,
www.merkfunds.com

Axel Merk

Axel Merk wrote the book on Sustainable Wealth; peek inside or order your copy today.

Axel Merk, President & CIO of Merk Investments, LLC, is an expert on hard money, macro trends and international investing. He is considered an authority on currencies.

The Merk Absolute Return Currency Fund seeks to generate positive absolute returns by investing in currencies. The Fund is a pure-play on currencies, aiming to profit regardless of the direction of the U.S. dollar or traditional asset classes.

The Merk Asian Currency Fund seeks to profit from a rise in Asian currencies versus the U.S. dollar. The Fund typically invests in a basket of Asian currencies that may include, but are not limited to, the currencies of China, Hong Kong, Japan, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan and Thailand.

The Merk Hard Currency Fund seeks to profit from a rise in hard currencies versus the U.S. dollar. Hard currencies are currencies backed by sound monetary policy; sound monetary policy focuses on price stability.

The Funds may be appropriate for you if you are pursuing a long-term goal with a currency component to your portfolio; are willing to tolerate the risks associated with investments in foreign currencies; or are looking for a way to potentially mitigate downside risk in or profit from a secular bear market. For more information on the Funds and to download a prospectus, please visit www.merkfunds.com.

Investors should consider the investment objectives, risks and charges and expenses of the Merk Funds carefully before investing. This and other information is in the prospectus, a copy of which may be obtained by visiting the Funds' website at www.merkfunds.com or calling 866-MERK FUND. Please read the prospectus carefully before you invest.

The Funds primarily invest in foreign currencies and as such, changes in currency exchange rates will affect the value of what the Funds own and the price of the Funds' shares. Investing in foreign instruments bears a greater risk than investing in domestic instruments for reasons such as volatility of currency exchange rates and, in some cases, limited geographic focus, political and economic instability, and relatively illiquid markets. The Funds are subject to interest rate risk which is the risk that debt securities in the Funds' portfolio will decline in value because of increases in market interest rates. The Funds may also invest in derivative securities which can be volatile and involve various types and degrees of risk. As a non-diversified fund, the Merk Hard Currency Fund will be subject to more investment risk and potential for volatility than a diversified fund because its portfolio may, at times, focus on a limited number of issuers. For a more complete discussion of these and other Fund risks please refer to the Funds' prospectuses.

This report was prepared by Merk Investments LLC, and reflects the current opinion of the authors. It is based upon sources and data believed to be accurate and reliable. Merk Investments LLC makes no representation regarding the advisability of investing in the products herein. Opinions and forward-looking statements expressed are subject to change without notice. This information does not constitute investment advice and is not intended as an endorsement of any specific investment. The information contained herein is general in nature and is provided solely for educational and informational purposes. The information provided does not constitute legal, financial or tax advice. You should obtain advice specific to your circumstances from your own legal, financial and tax advisors. As with any investment, past performance is no guarantee of future performance.

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